Category Archives: Poetry

Jeffrey Wainwright – The Reasoner

The world of Jeffrey Wainwright’s The Reasoner tends to be one underlined by controlled and self-assured impulses, whether the poems are dealing with generalised subjects and people or those drawn directly from his own sphere of experience. Reinscribed into the

Jeffrey Wainwright – The Reasoner

The world of Jeffrey Wainwright’s The Reasoner tends to be one underlined by controlled and self-assured impulses, whether the poems are dealing with generalised subjects and people or those drawn directly from his own sphere of experience. Reinscribed into the

Cordelia

If Grace Chia’s first collection Womango (1998) is, as its poet’s preface confides, about “the fuel which boils [the poet’s] blood and [her] womanhood,”[1] then what confronts us in Cordelia is a celebration of womanhood “gorgeous / head above water

Cordelia

If Grace Chia’s first collection Womango (1998) is, as its poet’s preface confides, about “the fuel which boils [the poet’s] blood and [her] womanhood,”[1] then what confronts us in Cordelia is a celebration of womanhood “gorgeous / head above water

Live in beauty and (im)possibilities

“All I want to do is make poetry famous.” Almost half way through Life Cycle by Dena Rash Guzman, the eloquent screamer David Lerner’s quote popped up, as I was still busy accepting my fate as a poetry reviewer –

Live in beauty and (im)possibilities

“All I want to do is make poetry famous.” Almost half way through Life Cycle by Dena Rash Guzman, the eloquent screamer David Lerner’s quote popped up, as I was still busy accepting my fate as a poetry reviewer –

to be near the mother in her dark place: Medbh McGuckian’s The High Caul Cap

With its talismanic title, the latest collection by Belfast poetess Medbh McGuckian, The High Caul Cap, sets in motion a flurry of gestures. The “caul,” An cul in the Gaelic, refers to an amniotic sack, once thought to be a

to be near the mother in her dark place: Medbh McGuckian’s The High Caul Cap

With its talismanic title, the latest collection by Belfast poetess Medbh McGuckian, The High Caul Cap, sets in motion a flurry of gestures. The “caul,” An cul in the Gaelic, refers to an amniotic sack, once thought to be a

In conversation: Relational Syntax

  Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?&v=jI-lbHknXgI Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaO3rKlYZO8 Jeremy Fernando chats with Marco and Adam in the reading room at Tembusu College, NUS about writing, art, music, and the edited collection Relational Syntax. Relational Syntax: Aesthetic awareness and ideological experience in

In conversation: Relational Syntax

  Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?&v=jI-lbHknXgI Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aaO3rKlYZO8 Jeremy Fernando chats with Marco and Adam in the reading room at Tembusu College, NUS about writing, art, music, and the edited collection Relational Syntax. Relational Syntax: Aesthetic awareness and ideological experience in

The Reader as Neophyte Mystic

In a way, the book’s subtitle, “Conversations with Yahia Lababidi,” is misleading. Ostensibly, the book comprises Alex Stein’s dialogues with Lababidi on the literary luminaries Franz Kafka, Charles Baudelaire, Friedrich Nietzsche, Rainer Maria Rilke, Vilhelm Ekelund, and Søren Kierkegaard. But

The Reader as Neophyte Mystic

In a way, the book’s subtitle, “Conversations with Yahia Lababidi,” is misleading. Ostensibly, the book comprises Alex Stein’s dialogues with Lababidi on the literary luminaries Franz Kafka, Charles Baudelaire, Friedrich Nietzsche, Rainer Maria Rilke, Vilhelm Ekelund, and Søren Kierkegaard. But